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Corporate Accountability in International Environmental Law$
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Elisa Morgera

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199558018

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199558018.001.0001

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Emerging Standards on Corporate Accountability in IEL

Emerging Standards on Corporate Accountability in IEL

Chapter:
(p.172) 8 Emerging Standards on Corporate Accountability in IEL
Source:
Corporate Accountability in International Environmental Law
Author(s):

Elisa Morgera

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199558018.003.0008

This chapter further investigates the convergence among the international environmental standards for corporate accountability identified or proposed by the international organizations previously discussed. It proceeds to clarify further the level of detail and international acceptance of these emerging international standards, also drawing upon recent developments in multilateral environmental agreements, in particular the Convention on Biological Diversity. The following emerging standards are considered as having reached a significant level of detail and acceptance at the international level: the self-assessment of environmental impacts, environmental management system; prevention, precaution, disclosure of environmental information; public consultations, and the sustainable use of natural resources. In all, these standards remain subject to specific application on a case-by-case basis. Nevertheless, a fundamental, minimum normative benchmark, firmly rooted in international environmental law, is emerging. According to these standards, it is now possible to appraise critically corporate conduct, even in the absence of, or in the presence of ineffective, national laws to this effect.

Keywords:   prevention, precaution, environmental impact assessment, access to information, participation, biodiversity, sustainable use, protected areas

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