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Just Another Major Crisis?The United States and Europe since 2000$
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Geir Lundestad

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199552030

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199552030.001.0001

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From the Cold War to the War on Terror: Old Threats, New Threats, and the Future of the Transatlantic Relationship

From the Cold War to the War on Terror: Old Threats, New Threats, and the Future of the Transatlantic Relationship

Chapter:
(p.58) 4 From the Cold War to the War on Terror: Old Threats, New Threats, and the Future of the Transatlantic Relationship
Source:
Just Another Major Crisis?
Author(s):

Michael Cox (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199552030.003.0004

Most observers agree that during the cold war the Soviet threat was crucial in holding the two sides of the Atlantic together. This chapter argues that terrorism will not hold the NATO members together in the way the Soviet threat did. In fact, as the war on terror unfolds with probably more attacks on Europe than on the United States, “the divide between the two will grow.” Many in Europe felt that the American approach to fighting terrorism, as exemplified by Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib, was counterproductive. Divorce between the two sides may not occur, but they are likely to drift further apart. “There is no way of returning to some presumed golden past of allied unity using the vehicle of something so ill-defined as an ‘Islamic threat’ to hold the alliance together.”

Keywords:   terrorism, NATO, drift, United States, Guantanamo, Europe

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