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Jobs with Equality$
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Lane Kenworthy

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199550593

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199550593.001.0001

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Toward a High‐Employment, High‐Equality Society

Toward a High‐Employment, High‐Equality Society

Chapter:
(p.273) 11 Toward a High‐Employment, High‐Equality Society
Source:
Jobs with Equality
Author(s):

Lane Kenworthy (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199550593.003.00011

This chapter summarizes the book's findings, recommends some strategies for combining low inequality with high employment, and considers some potential objections and alternatives. It argues that there is no silver bullet for a country wishing to be a high-equality, high-employment society. Each country is different in its existing configuration of institutions and policies, and in its citizens' preferences about equality and employment. Thus, there is no one-size-fits-all reform package that will yield optimal results for every nation. Given the considerable uncertainty regarding the best course of action for any particular country, governments and other economic actors have little option but to experiment. Success requires learning from the experiences of other countries, learning from one's own past, and continuous experimentation and adjustment.

Keywords:   equality, inequality, employment, reform, experiment

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