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Biodiversity, Ecosystem Functioning, and Human WellbeingAn Ecological and Economic Perspective$
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Shahid Naeem, Daniel E. Bunker, Andy Hector, Michel Loreau, and Charles Perrings

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199547951

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199547951.001.0001

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Consequences of species loss for ecosystem functioning: meta-analyses of data from biodiversity experiments

Consequences of species loss for ecosystem functioning: meta-analyses of data from biodiversity experiments

Chapter:
(p.14) 2 Consequences of species loss for ecosystem functioning: meta-analyses of data from biodiversity experiments
Source:
Biodiversity, Ecosystem Functioning, and Human Wellbeing
Author(s):

Bernhard Schmid

Patricia Balvanera

Bradley J. Cardinale

Jasmin Godbold

Andrea B. Pfisterer

David Raffaelli

Martin Solan

Diane S. Srivastava

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199547951.003.0002

A large number of studies have now explicitly examined the relationship between species loss and ecosystem function. Analyzed by two independent groups, the results from such experiments show that reductions in species diversity generally result in reduced ecosystem functioning, across a wide range of ecosystems, diversity manipulations, and functions. This chapter analyzes both data sets in parallel to explain variation in the observed functional effects of biodiversity. This chapter concludes: 1) the functional effects of biodiversity differ among ecosystem types (but not between terrestrial and aquatic systems), 2) increases in species richness enhance community responses but negatively affect population responses, 3) stocks are more responsive than rates, 4) diversity reductions often reduce function at an adjacent trophic level, 5) increased biodiversity results in increased invasion resistance. This chapter also analyzes the shape of the relationship between biodiversity and function, and discuss consequences of different relationships.

Keywords:   biodiversity, ecosystem function, meta-analysis, trophic levels, aquatic, terrestrial

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