Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Biodiversity, Ecosystem Functioning, and Human Wellbeing$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Shahid Naeem, Daniel E. Bunker, Andy Hector, Michel Loreau, and Charles Perrings

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199547951

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199547951.001.0001

Subscriber Login

Forgotten your password?

ContentsFRONT MATTER

Opening communities to colonization – the impacts of invaders on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

Chapter:
(p.217) 16 Opening communities to colonization – the impacts of invaders on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning
Source:
Biodiversity, Ecosystem Functioning, and Human Wellbeing
Author(s):

Katharina Engelhardt

Amy Symstad

Anne-Helene Prieur-Richard

Matthew Thomas

Daniel E. Bunker

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199547951.003.0016

Research on the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning typically varies biodiversity levels by establishing communities that are subsets of the species in the high diversity community. This chapter examines what happens when biodiversity change is not limited to these subsets but instead is open to colonization from a larger species pool. The chapter first examines species traits that are responsible for successful colonization, establishment, and impact on ecosystem processes. The chapter then addresses how novel species may produce cascading and irreversible effects, drawing on known processes (selection effect or complementarity effect) that drive relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Finally, the chapter explores how information on species traits and processes driving the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning may be used to enhance the economic evaluation of invasion risks to society.

Keywords:   invasion, biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, immigration, functional traits, economic evaluation, risk analysis, management

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .