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Economic Evaluation in Child Health$
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Wendy Ungar

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199547494

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199547494.001.0001

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Economic evaluations of interventions for children in the developing world: The WHO-CHOICE approach

Economic evaluations of interventions for children in the developing world: The WHO-CHOICE approach

Chapter:
(p.241) Chapter 13 Economic evaluations of interventions for children in the developing world: The WHO-CHOICE approach
Source:
Economic Evaluation in Child Health
Author(s):

Tessa Tan-Torres Edejer

Moses Aikins

Robert Black

Lara Wolfson

Raymond Hutubessy

David B. Evans

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199547494.003.13

There are logistical and analytical challenges when conducting economic evaluations in the developing world, ranging from lack of data on costs to determining generalizability. This chapter describes the WHO-CHOICE approach, a generalized form of cost-effectiveness analysis. By using the ‘null’ scenario which assumes an absence of interventions for treating or preventing a condition of interest, this method allows existing and new interventions to be analysed at the same time. Cost-effectiveness analysis for child health interventions are presented including oral rehydration therapy, case management for pneumonia, Vitamin A and zinc supplementation and fortification, provision of supplementary food during weaning with nutrition counseling, and measles vaccination using the WHO-CHOICE approach. Methods for costing interventions and assessing the population impact of the interventions are presented. Results are expressed in terms of cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the value of the WHO-CHOICE approach to inform resource allocation.

Keywords:   WHO-CHOICE, cost-effectiveness analysis, child health, vitamin supplementation, nutrition counseling, measles vaccination, disability-adjusted life year, DALY

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