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Death and the AuthorHow D. H. Lawrence Died, and Was Remembered$
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David Ellis

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199546657

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546657.001.0001

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Lying for Truth

Lying for Truth

Chapter:
(p.178) 17 Lying for Truth
Source:
Death and the Author
Author(s):

David Ellis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546657.003.0017

This chapter discusses Frieda's affair with Murry, Lawrence's closest friend, his enthusiastic and sometimes slavish disciple. After Lawrence's death, Murry came to visit the grave perhaps, but also to see what he could do to help Frieda. Murry's sexual relations with Frieda in 1930 were no doubt more conventional and there is no record of any ghost of her late husband coming back from the dead to prevent them. Murry offered Frieda a reminder that Lawrence had once made a will in which he left everything to her. Frieda makes no mention of a will and it was only after it that she began to claim that there had been one which was lost during the removal from New Mexico. By the terms of Frieda's will half the royalties which that event generated went to her three children by Weekley while the other half went to Angelo and the wife and children he had by then rejoined in Italy. The bargain struck in 1932 meant that members of the Lawrence family continued to receive nothing at all.

Keywords:   D. H. Lawrence, Frieda, John Middleton Murry, sexual relations, death, will

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