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Death and the AuthorHow D. H. Lawrence Died, and Was Remembered$
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David Ellis

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199546657

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546657.001.0001

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The Hour of Our Death

The Hour of Our Death

Chapter:
(p.120) 12 The Hour of Our Death
Source:
Death and the Author
Author(s):

David Ellis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546657.003.0012

This chapter discusses death. Sudden death is the only thing to fear. Nowadays our attitude is likely to be different. Most of us would declare a preference for dropping dead in the street rather than dying from a long and painful illness. Christians in the past feared sudden death because it left them no time to confess their sins and settle their spiritual as well as material affairs. Lawrence angrily discharged himself from the Ad Astra; he was probably not at all reconciled to dying but rather expecting that he was in for one of those hard battles from which he had emerged victorious so many times before. Frieda helped him move into the Villa Robermond (a rented house) in Vence. When he left the Ad Astra, Lawrence died quickly.

Keywords:   D. H. Lawrence, Frieda, death, dying, Christians, Ad Astra, Villa Robermond

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