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Religion in Public LifeMust Faith Be Privatized?$
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Roger Trigg

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199543670

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199543670.001.0001

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Religion in State Education

Religion in State Education

Chapter:
(p.171) 9 Religion in State Education
Source:
Religion in Public Life
Author(s):

Roger Trigg

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199543670.003.0010

This chapter is divided into the following sections: should religion be taught?; indoctrination or self-development?; celebrating diversity; the role of tradition; and Australian individualism. The issue of whether religion is a public or private matter becomes particularly controversial when its place in schools is considered. The second section examines the fear of indoctrination as opposed to developing understanding of a religion. The third section argues that the celebration of diversity may be a political aim in society where a government may be afraid of smouldering racial and religious tensions. The fourth section argues that one's own traditions, beliefs, and conceptions of society should be the starting point of finding the truth. The last section of the chapter examines an Australian educationalist's concerns on teaching religion.

Keywords:   religion, Australian individualism, diversity, indoctrination, teaching religion, religious understanding, tradition, beliefs

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