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Medieval LuccaAnd the Evolution of the Renaissance State$
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M. E. Bratchel

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199542901

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199542901.001.0001

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The Fourteenth Century: The Lucchese State from the Loss of Independence to the Recovery of Liberty

The Fourteenth Century: The Lucchese State from the Loss of Independence to the Recovery of Liberty

Chapter:
(p.82) 4 The Fourteenth Century: The Lucchese State from the Loss of Independence to the Recovery of Liberty
Source:
Medieval Lucca
Author(s):

M. E. Bratchel (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199542901.003.0004

Excluding the years when Lucca, with much of north‐west Tuscany, was ruled by Castruccio Castracani, the 14th century was for Lucca a time of crisis and humiliation. After 1328 Lucca passed, often by purchase, under the dominion of a series of foreign lords; the city eventually ended up under the rule of the hated Pisans. During these years Lucca's territorial boundaries were permanently and significantly reduced; some Lucchese vicariates were taken over by Lucca's masters, others fell into private hands. The rule of one city by another did not necessarily lead to interference in the political or administrative structures of the subject city; the privatization of individual vicariates was to prove aberrant and short lived. This chapter argues that the nature of the Lucchese state was not subverted in essentials by the period of foreign rule. The state recovered by the restored republic in 1370 was smaller but unchanged in its fundamental characteristics. The richer documentation of the fourteenth century enables me to explore these defining characteristics in much greater detail, both for the heartland of the Lucchese state and for those territories that passed temporarily out of Lucca's control.

Keywords:   Castruccio Castracani, Guelfs and Ghibellines, rural statutes, privatization of vicariates

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