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Matters of the HeartHistory, Medicine, and Emotion$
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Fay Bound Alberti

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199540976

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199540976.001.0001

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Angina Pectoris and the Arnold Family

Angina Pectoris and the Arnold Family

Chapter:
(p.90) 4 Angina Pectoris and the Arnold Family
Source:
Matters of the Heart
Author(s):

Fay Bound Alberti

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199540976.003.0005

This chapter examines the hereditary and congenital case of angina pectoris in the family of Rugby School headmaster Thomas Arnold, who died of the disease on June 11, 1842. The same disease killed his father William and his son Matthew. This chapter analyses Arnold's cases in the context of the conceptualization of the nature of heart disease in Victorian Britain. These include Kirstie Blair's analysis of the poetics of the heart as both organ and symbol in Victorian literature and Charles F. Wooley's detailed account of the emergence of nervous-heart syndrome.

Keywords:   angina pectoris, congenital disease, Thomas Arnold, Victorian Britain, Kirstie Blair, poetics, Rugby School

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