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After the FallGerman Policy in Occupied France, 1940-1944$
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Thomas J. Laub

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199539321

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199539321.001.0001

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The Shocking Defeat

The Shocking Defeat

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 The Shocking Defeat
Source:
After the Fall
Author(s):

Thomas J. Laub

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199539321.003.0002

‘The shocking defeat’ begins with an overview of Allied and Axis military strategy during the phony war, surveys German plans for the invasion of France, and describes the Western Campaign between May and June 1940. In the face of what might be called ‘catastrophic success', Hitler placed conservative generals in charge of an improvised military administration, and the latter established a standard of conduct that was largely unadulterated by Nazi ideology. The 1938 Munich Agreement and the 1939 Nazi‐Soviet Non‐Aggression Pact prepared French society for some of the dramatic changes associated with military defeat and the 1940 Armistice Agreement.

Keywords:   Case Yellow, Fall Gelb, Western Campaign, phony war, military strategy, 1940 Armistice Agreement, Military Commander in France, Militärbefehlshaber in Frankreich, military administration

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