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Leaderless Europe$
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Jack Hayward

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199535026

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199535026.001.0001

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Introduction: Inhibited Consensual Leadership within an Interdependent Confederal Europe

Introduction: Inhibited Consensual Leadership within an Interdependent Confederal Europe

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction: Inhibited Consensual Leadership within an Interdependent Confederal Europe
Source:
Leaderless Europe
Author(s):

Jack Hayward (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199535026.003.0001

Piecemeal power-sharing by nation statesmen has inconspicuously promoted incremental complex change over time, and this has produced outcomes of imprecise parentage. The result is a polycentric European Union of member-state elites making consociational confidential concessions lacking democratic legitimacy, which has prompted populist hostility. Public acquiescence is secured by an increasing tendency to lead from behind, which relies upon humdrum rather than heroic decision-making. Surreptitious integration through action traps that lead further than it is at first apparent, and successive enlargements that seem boundless have created uncertainty about community and purpose. Veto groups constrain the capacity for non-covert change. Federalist ambitions have been replaced by the implicit acceptance of confederal tension between limited integration and residual sovereignty.

Keywords:   polycentric, confederal, sovereignty, power-sharing, change capacity, action traps, veto groups, populist

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