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Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland$
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Christopher Highley

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199533404

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199533404.001.0001

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Turks, Northerners, and the Barbarous Heretic

Turks, Northerners, and the Barbarous Heretic

Chapter:
(p.54) 3 Turks, Northerners, and the Barbarous Heretic
Source:
Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland
Author(s):

Christopher Highley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199533404.003.0003

Turks, Northerners, and the Barbarous Heretic focuses on the connections forged in Catholic texts between Protestant heretics and Turkish infidels — an analogy that reversed Protestant accusations and that demonstrated how so-called reformers were not just un-English but the quintessential enemies of the Church. Catholic polemic about Protestants-as-Turks was complexly related to other tropes of heresy and barbarism, particularly to geohumoral discourses that identified the north as the seat of heresy. Through the polemical linkages of Turk, northerner, and heretic, Catholic writers were able to explore fundamental questions about religious persecution and toleration, as well as about what it meant to be civilized and English.

Keywords:   Turks, barbarism, northerners, heretics

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