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Families’ ValuesHow Parents, Siblings, and Children Affect Political Attitudes$
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R. Urbatsch

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199373604

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199373604.001.0001

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Birth Order Revisited: Attitudes Toward Morality

Birth Order Revisited: Attitudes Toward Morality

Chapter:
(p.64) Chapter 4 Birth Order Revisited: Attitudes Toward Morality
Source:
Families’ Values
Author(s):

R. Urbatsch

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199373604.003.0004

Alongside the messages they send about politics as such, elder siblings also exert other influences that can indirectly shape their younger siblings’ political attitudes. One of the more established effects of having older siblings is that it tends to lead to earlier and wider-ranging sexual experimentation. The younger siblings are then likely to be more acceptant of sexual activities that firstborn children dislike. They may also accept policies and social mores that are relatively permissive toward sexual activity. Indeed, younger siblings are decidedly more tolerant of premarital sex and to a lesser degree more acceptant of abortion and homosexuality.

Keywords:   firstborn, siblings, premarital sex, abortion, homosexuality

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