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Dislocated MemoriesJews, Music, and Postwar German Culture$
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Tina Frühauf and Lily Hirsch

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199367481

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199367481.001.0001

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“With an Open Mind and with Respect”

“With an Open Mind and with Respect”

Klezmer as a Site of the Jewish Fringe in Germany in the Early Twenty-first Century

Chapter:
(p.31) 2 “With an Open Mind and with Respect”
Source:
Dislocated Memories
Author(s):

Joel E. Rubin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199367481.003.0002

Research on the the recent klezmer movement generally obscures the fact that the contemporary klezmer scene in Germany is dynamic and has evolved over a more than twenty-year period. It comprises participants from numerous backgrounds and generations, including Jews from the former Soviet Union, Israel, and the United States as well as both non-Jewish and Jewish Germans, from the former German Democratic Republic as well as West Germany. The chapter shows that the German market also had a strong influence on the development of klezmer internationally—particularly in the United States—as well as interesting inter-European and cross-continental collaborations that have developed in recent years. This chapter situates contemporary German klezmer within a broader framework by interviewing prominent klezmer musicians in the German scene. In so doing, this ethnography shows that, while issues related to the Holocaust and the building of a post-Cold War German identity are central themes, klezmer is inherently transnational—involving multiple nationalities and concerns beyond a simple coming to terms with the German past.

Keywords:   Klezmer music revival, Yiddish music, Yiddish song, Hackesches Hoftheater, Yiddish Summer Revival, Dan Kahn, Global Shetetl Band, German klezmer scene, klezmer in Berlin

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