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Inside the Politics of Self-Determination$
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Kathleen Gallagher Cunningham

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199364909

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199364909.001.0001

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Turning Violence Inward

Turning Violence Inward

Chapter:
(p.129) Chapter 6 Turning Violence Inward
Source:
Inside the Politics of Self-Determination
Author(s):

Kathleen Gallagher Cunningham

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199364909.003.0006

This chapter centers on explaining how divisions within self-determination (SD) groups and the larger bargaining over self-determination with the state create incentives for violence between factions and against civilians within SD groups. There is always competition among factions within SD groups to be the dominant actor at the bargaining table (and to get the spoils accompanying this position). This leads SD factions to try to signal to the state that they are important bargaining partners through the use of violence. Statistical analysis shows that factional fighting and targeting of in-group civilians is more likely when groups are more divided. The northeast India conflict cases show that factions seek private benefits and use violence to try to establish dominance among competing factions.

Keywords:   bargaining, factional fighting, statistical analysis, self-determination, SD, northeast India, southern Sudan

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