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Gender and Private Security in Global Politics$
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Maya Eichler

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199364374

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199364374.001.0001

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From Warriors of Empire to Martial Contractors

From Warriors of Empire to Martial Contractors

Reimagining Gurkhas in Private Security

Chapter:
(p.95) Chapter 5 From Warriors of Empire to Martial Contractors
Source:
Gender and Private Security in Global Politics
Author(s):

Amanda Chisholm

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199364374.003.0006

Recent gender scholarship on private security has revealed the ways in which the industry’s growth in operations works to (re)shape gender relations in a variety of global settings. By incorporating a postcolonial analysis into existing gendered examinations of PMSCs, this chapter undertakes an analysis of the intersections of racialized and gendered hierarchies in the private security industry. Drawing upon postcolonial scholarship and coupling it with fieldwork conducted in Nepal and Afghanistan, this chapter explores the historical and contemporary continuities as well as discontinuities between Gurkhas, a specific group of racialized security contractors, and their Western security counterparts. This chapter hopes to overcome the construction of mutually exclusive security subjects and illustrate how the interactions between Gurkhas and Western security contractors create a greater whole—one where both subjects find agency and are complicit in the constitution of the security industry.

Keywords:   postcolonial, feminism, Gurkhas, private military and security companies, PMSCs, martial race, TCNs, postcolonial

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