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The Hip Hop & Obama Reader
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The Hip Hop & Obama Reader

Travis L. Gosa and Erik Nielson

Abstract

This book offers the first systematic, scholarly analysis of the complex relationship between hip hop and politics in the era of Barack Obama. It invites readers to reassess how the historical narrative of Obama’s presidency continues to be shaped by the voice of hip hop and, conversely, how the voice of hip hop itself has been shaped by Obama. Drawing on a variety of methodological approaches from some of America’s most distinguished scholars, journalists, and activists, the book critically and unromantically assesses hip hop as an agent of social and political change, both now and in the fut ... More

Keywords: Barack Obama, hip hop, rap music, politics, youth, activism, race, gender, inequality, neoliberalism

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2015 Print ISBN-13: 9780199341801
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2015 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199341801.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Travis L. Gosa, editor
Assistant Professor of Social Science, Cornell University

Erik Nielson, editor
Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts, University of Richmond

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Contents

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Introduction

Erik Nielson and Travis L. Gosa

I Move the Crowd: Hip Hop Politics in the United States and Abroad

1 Message from the Grassroots

Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar

2 It’s Bigger Than Barack

Bakari Kitwana and Elizabeth Méndez Berry

3 “There Are No Saviors”

Travis L. Gosa and Erik Nielson

4 “Obama Nation”

Sujatha Fernandes

5 “Record! I Am Arab”

Torie Rose DeGhett

II Change We can Believe in? The Contested Discourse of Obama and Hip Hop

8 Obama/Time

Murray Forman

10 “New Slaves”

Raphael Heaggans

III Represent: Gender and Language in the Obama Era

13 The King’s English

Michael P. Jeffries

14 “My President Is Black”

James Peterson and Cynthia Estremera