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Becoming OttomansSephardi Jews and Imperial Citizenship in the Modern Era$
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Julia Phillips Cohen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199340408

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199340408.001.0001

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Contest and Conflict

Contest and Conflict

Jewish Ottomanism in a Constitutional Regime

Chapter:
(p.103) 4 Contest and Conflict
Source:
Becoming Ottomans
Author(s):

Julia Phillips Cohen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199340408.003.0005

Chapter 4 examines Jews’ responses to the visit of Sultan Mehmed V to Salonica in 1911. At this time, Ottoman Jewish elites found themselves competing for the attentions of their sovereign and state not only against members of other Ottoman millets but also against one another. Local Jewish Zionists and anti-Zionists attempted to woo imperial authorities, hosting soirees and erecting various decorative arches across the urban landscape. Things were further complicated after a number of Salonican Jewish socialists were accused of harboring ill will toward the sultan and planning to disrupt the festivities surrounding his visit. After the arrest of several Jewish socialists, the carefully woven myth that posited the unflagging loyalty of all of Ottoman Jewry—reinforced by Jewish communal leaders over decades—suddenly threatened to unravel.

Keywords:   Zionism, anti-Zionism, socialism, spies, Sultan Mehmed V, Ottoman Macedonia, Salonica, parliament, Young Turk revolution, Jews

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