Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Social EqualityOn What It Means to be Equals$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Carina Fourie, Fabian Schuppert, and Ivo Wallimann-Helmer

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199331109

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199331109.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 24 October 2017

The Practice of Equality

The Practice of Equality

Chapter:
(p.20) (p.21) 1 The Practice of Equality
Source:
Social Equality
Author(s):

Samuel Scheffler

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199331109.003.0002

This Chapter discusses two views of equality: the distributive view and the relational view. According to the first view, equality is an essentially distributive value. We can directly assess distributions as being more or less egalitarian, and justice requires that we strive to achieve fully egalitarian distributions, except insofar as other values forbid it. According to the relational view, equality is an ideal governing certain kinds of interpersonal relationships. It plays a central role in political philosophy because justice requires the establishment of a society of equals, a society whose members relate to one another on a footing of equality. This chapter develops the relational view in greater detail and argues that it is not, contrary to what some have suggested, merely a variant of the distributive view.

Keywords:   distributive equality, relational equality, society of equals, deliberative constraint, social relationships

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .