Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Heart of Human Rights$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Allen Buchanan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199325382

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199325382.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 October 2018

A Pluralistic Justificatory Methodology for Human Rights

A Pluralistic Justificatory Methodology for Human Rights

Chapter:
(p.50) Chapter 2 A Pluralistic Justificatory Methodology for Human Rights
Source:
The Heart of Human Rights
Author(s):

Allen Buchanan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199325382.003.0002

This chapter begins to make the case for rejecting the assumption that justified legal human rights must correspond to (or at least help to realize) preexisting moral human rights and makes the case instead for a pluralistic justificatory strategy—one that recognizes that international legal human rights, like legal rights generally, can be justified on the basis of a several different types of moral considerations, of which the need to realize preexisting moral rights is only one. It shows that some of the most prominent contributors to the contemporary philosophical literature on human rights have made unwarranted assumptions about the relationship between moral and legal human rights and that doing so has led them to an inadequate conception of the task of justifying the international legal human rights system.

Keywords:   egalitarian, default duties, functions, pluralistic justificatory methodology, primary duties, task of justification, well-being

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .