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Ungoverning DanceContemporary European Theatre Dance and the Commons$
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Ramsay Burt

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199321926

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199321926.001.0001

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Performing Friendship

Performing Friendship

Chapter:
(p.141) 7 Performing Friendship
Source:
Ungoverning Dance
Author(s):

Ramsay Burt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199321926.003.0007

This chapter offers readings of a selection of dances that it calls ‘duos’ rather than duets, performed by two collaborators of the same sex but different backgrounds. These, it proposes are performances of friendship. Recently, sociologists and philosophers have been pointing out that friendship is in many ways becoming problematic because of the kinds of working relations that have developed in postindustrial society. An alternative to this is presented in the deconstructive idea of the responsibilities of friendship found in the writings of Maurice Blanchot. The chapter explores these differing ideas about friendship in discussions of four recent duos by Matthilde Monnier and La Ribot, Akram Khan and Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, Jérôme Bel and Pichet Klunchun, and Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion.

Keywords:   ethico-aesthetics, friendship, responsibility, Maurice Blanchot, Matthilde Monnier, La Ribot, Akram Khan, Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, Jérôme Bel, Pichet Klunchun

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