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The Biology of Polar Regions$
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D.N. Thomas, G.E. Fogg, P. Convey, C.H. Fritsen, J.-M. Gili, R. Gradinger, J. Laybourn-Parry, K. Reid, and D.W.H. Walton

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199298112

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199298112.001.0001

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Some conclusions

Some conclusions

Chapter:
(p.332) 12 Some conclusions
Source:
The Biology of Polar Regions
Author(s):

David N. Thomas

G.E. (Tony) Fogg

Peter Convey

Christian H. Fritsen

Josep-Maria Gili

Rolf Gradinger

Johanna Laybourn-Parry

Keith Reid

David W.H. Walton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199298112.003.0012

This chapter presents some concluding thoughts about polar habitats and polar ecology. It argues that polar habitats are unique and of great intrinsic interest to ecologists. Their study helps us understand, and to some extent cope with, the damage humans have caused to global environment.

Keywords:   polar regions, polar habitats, polar ecology, ecologists

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