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Fallen Nature, Fallen SelvesEarly Modern French Thought II$
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Michael Moriarty

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199291038

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199291038.001.0001

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Original Sin

Original Sin

Chapter:
(p.109) 2 Original Sin
Source:
Fallen Nature, Fallen Selves
Author(s):

Michael Moriarty (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199291038.003.0003

The Augustinian theory is contrasted with that of Aquinas, which holds a view of human nature as damaged by the Fall, but not radically perverted, and with the later hypothetical model of a ‘state of pure nature’, as developed by the Spanish theologian Suárez. Seventeenth-century Augustinian accounts are discussed: Senault stresses, like Augustine, that the whole fabric of the world has been corrupted by Adam and Eve’s sin; Pascal focuses on human nature alone, developing a vision of its contradictions, which only the Christian revelation can illuminate; Malebranche seeks to integrate Augustinian theology with Cartesian philosophy, showing how the dualistic mind-body theory can illuminate the enigma of the transmission of original sin from one generation of human beings to the next.

Keywords:   Augustine, Jansenius, Aquinas, Suárez, Senault, Pascal, Malebranche

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