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Jewish Slavery in Antiquity$
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Catherine Hezser

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199280865

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199280865.001.0001

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The Location of Slaves in Ancient Jewish Society

The Location of Slaves in Ancient Jewish Society

Chapter:
(p.285) 13 The Location of Slaves in Ancient Jewish Society
Source:
Jewish Slavery in Antiquity
Author(s):

Catherine Hezser (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199280865.003.0014

Although the actual number and percentage of slaves in ancient Jewish society cannot be determined any more, one can hypothesise about the social and economic location of slaves amongst the Jewish inhabitants of Roman Palestine. One way to arrive at such a hypothesis is to look at the representations of slave ownership and slaves' activities in ancient Jewish sources. Another, complementary way to assess slaves' location is to look at their structural place in other Roman provinces and to use that model as an analogy. The problem with such an approach is that it may be too generalising, not taking local differences into account. If both of these approaches are combined, they may yield results which may approximate historical reality, although certainty can never be reached in this regard.

Keywords:   slaves, Jewish society, Roman Palestine, Roman provinces, local differences

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