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The Collective Responsibility of States to Protect Refugees$
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Agnès Hurwitz

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199278381

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199278381.001.0001

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Origins and Developments of Arrangements to Allocate Responsibility for the Protection of Refugees

Origins and Developments of Arrangements to Allocate Responsibility for the Protection of Refugees

Chapter:
(p.9) 1 Origins and Developments of Arrangements to Allocate Responsibility for the Protection of Refugees
Source:
The Collective Responsibility of States to Protect Refugees
Author(s):

Agnès Hurwitz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199278381.003.0002

This chapter recalls the historical background to the development of responsibility allocation and safe third country practices. It begins with an overview of the fundamental concepts and instruments of international refugee law, and proceeds with a description of the changes that affected refugee flows at the end of the 1970s and led to the progressive decline of protection standards and the development of restrictive refugee policies, including an analysis of the failed UN Conference on territorial asylum and of the discussions that took place within the Executive Committee of UNHCR. Developments at the regional level are also covered, namely, the negotiations of the two draft agreements on responsibility for examining an asylum request prepared by the ‘Ad Hoc Committee on the Legal Aspects of Asylum and Refugees’ of the Council of Europe (CAHAR), and the gradual rise to prominence of the European Community in the asylum and migration fields.

Keywords:   safe third country practices, international refugee law, refugee protection, UNHCR, European Community

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