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Athens in ParisAncient Greece and the Political in Post-War French Thought$
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Miriam Leonard

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199277254

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199277254.001.0001

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Epilogue: Reception and the Political

Epilogue: Reception and the Political

Chapter:
(p.216) 3 Epilogue: Reception and the Political
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Athens in Paris
Author(s):

Miriam Leonard (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199277254.003.0005

How far can reading the Greeks politically get us? This concluding chapter questions whether an innovative approach to the political — a new theory of democracy — has emerged from the French post-war encounter with 5th century Athens. Did post-war France rediscover Greece in the shadow of German tyranny to write the script of a truly emancipatory politics for the future? Can one see beyond the humanist appropriation of classical culture or is the return to antiquity inevitably a revisiting of the worst exclusionary narratives of the enlightenment? The chapter contrasts the reception of antiquity in the work of Jean-Paul Sartre with the later investment in the classical past explored in this book.

Keywords:   Jean-Paul Sartre, Germany, tyranny, democracy, humanism

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