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Internationalized Criminal CourtsSierra Leone, East Timor, Kosovo, and Cambodia$
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Cesare P.R. Romano, André Nollkaemper, and Jann K. Kleffner

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199276745

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199276745.001.0001

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Geographical and Jurisdictional Reach of ICC: Gaps in the International Criminal Justice System and a Role for Internationalized Bodies

Geographical and Jurisdictional Reach of ICC: Gaps in the International Criminal Justice System and a Role for Internationalized Bodies

Chapter:
(p.417) 19 Geographical and Jurisdictional Reach of ICC: Gaps in the International Criminal Justice System and a Role for Internationalized Bodies
Source:
Internationalized Criminal Courts
Author(s):

Mariacarmen Colitti

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199276745.003.0019

On July 1, 2002, the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into force. The establishment of the ICC can be considered a great achievement in the work for prosecution of gross violations of humanitarian law and human rights by individuals. Its purpose is to provide a permanent criminal forum, potentially with universal reach, to try war crimes and gross violations of human rights. On the other hand, the internationalized courts and tribunals in Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Cambodia, and East Timor were created in the interregnum between the adoption of the Rome Statute and its entry into force. This chapter examines the range of the ICC's jurisdiction to determine to what extent, and in which instances, internationalized criminal bodies might help try the most horrendous crimes.

Keywords:   Rome Statute, International Criminal Court, internationalized criminal tribunals, internationalized criminal courts, jurisdiction, Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Cambodia, East Timor, war crimes

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