Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Labyrinths of InformationChallenging the Wisdom of Systems$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Claudio Ciborra

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199275267

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199275267.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 November 2017

Kairos (and Affectio)

Kairos (and Affectio)

Chapter:
(p.153) 8 Kairos (and Affectio)
Source:
The Labyrinths of Information
Author(s):

Claudio Ciborra

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199275267.003.0008

Turbulent economic times put improvisation at the centre stage of business management and organization studies. In principle, when reconstructing improvised decision making, symbolic representations of the ongoing problem can be drawn, algorithms can be identified, and problem solving programmes can be written. But, once improvisation gets analysed as quick design and simultaneous implementation of plans of action, factoring early feedback from execution, where has its magic gone? Can such an analysis offer anything new or alternative to the prevailing managerial and systems models that put at the centre of their discourse information, knowledge modelling, and planning? To overcome such an impasse, there is a need to assess the intellectual roots of situated action, of which improvisation is considered a special case, in phenomenology.

Keywords:   improvisation, panic, boredom, cognitive study

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .