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HRM and PerformanceAchieving Long Term Viability$
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Jaap Paauwe

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199273904

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273904.001.0001

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Continuing Divergence of HRM Practices: US and European-Based Company-Level HRM Practices

Continuing Divergence of HRM Practices: US and European-Based Company-Level HRM Practices

Chapter:
(p.155) 8 Continuing Divergence of HRM Practices: US and European-Based Company-Level HRM Practices
Source:
HRM and Performance
Author(s):

Ferrie Pot

Jaap Paauwe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199273904.003.0008

It is important to note that human resource managers should consider their organization's institutional environment. This institutional environment is composed of a wide variety of dimensions since institutional influences may include region, locality, and other such important aspects. The nation state proves to be one of the most significant sources of institutional influence on the performance of various practices for HRM, and this is encompassed by what is commonly referred to as ‘national culture’ or the specific set of national institutions. Several literatures on organization have already illustrated evaluations of the cultural peculiarities associated with employment relationships in a nation state. This chapter provides a throrough comparative study of multinational chemical industry companies (MNCs) that are based in Holland and in the USA.

Keywords:   USA, Holland, MNCs, national culture, nation state, institutional environment, institutional influence

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