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Wandering SignificanceAn Essay on Conceptual Behaviour$
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Mark Wilson

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199269259

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199269259.001.0001

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THE CRITIC OF NATURE AND GENIUS

THE CRITIC OF NATURE AND GENIUS

Chapter:
(p.599) 10 THE CRITIC OF NATURE AND GENIUS
Source:
Wandering Significance
Author(s):

Mark Wilson (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199269259.003.0010

The vital role of ‘concept’ as our chief means for expressing an evaluation of our present capacities for semantic diagnosis and control is reviewed, leading to chastened expectations that lie intermediate between the excessive optimism of classical thinking and the radical pessimism endemic to pragmatism. These considerations indicate a crucial need for a temperate form of semantic scepticism within our philosophical thinking, a lesson that the present chapter applies to a number of controversies prominent in current debate. An allied viewpoint is brought to bear upon familiar worries about the role of ‘truth’ in our thinking and the problems involved in ‘understanding’ another culture.

Keywords:   mitigated scepticism, possible worlds, truth, deflationism, indeterminancy of translation, incommensurability, cultural understanding

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