Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Art, Emotion and Ethics$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Berys Gaut

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199263219

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199263219.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 September 2018

Emotion and Imagination

Emotion and Imagination

Chapter:
(p.203) 9 Emotion and Imagination
Source:
Art, Emotion and Ethics
Author(s):

Berys Gaut (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199263219.003.0009

Emotions figure in both the cognitive argument, through the idea of emotional education, and in the merited response argument. This chapter argues for emotional realism, the doctrine that emotions can be real rather than merely imagined when directed towards fictional situations, and that such emotions can be rational. The most influential irrealist account due to Kendall Walton is criticized. It is argued that one need not have an appropriate belief in order to have an emotion, an anti-judgementalist position defended by Patricia Greenspan. It is also shown that the motivational aspect of an emotion may consist only in a desire or wish. Three criteria are developed for the rationality of emotions. It is argued that according to these criteria, fiction-directed emotions can be rational.

Keywords:   anti-judgementalism, emotional realism, emotion and fictions, Greenspan, rationality, Walton

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .