Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Art, Emotion and Ethics$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Berys Gaut

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199263219

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199263219.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 August 2018

Aesthetics and Ethics: Basic Concepts

Aesthetics and Ethics: Basic Concepts

Chapter:
(p.26) 2 Aesthetics and Ethics: Basic Concepts
Source:
Art, Emotion and Ethics
Author(s):

Berys Gaut (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199263219.003.0002

This chapter clarifies the concepts of the aesthetic and ethical. It asks what aesthetic concepts, as listed in Sibley's account, have in common. It criticizes aesthetic attitude theories, such as those by Scruton and Stolnitz, which are inspired by Kant; and it also rejects theories of the aesthetic due to Beardsley and Alan Goldman. Instead, it develops an artistic theory of the aesthetic, which holds that the aesthetic properties of artworks are their evaluative properties that give them their value qua artworks. It also distinguishes two notions of the ethical, and the narrower one is understood in terms of a subset of character virtues, distinguished by the nature of the concern they manifest towards other people.

Keywords:   aesthetic attitude, artistic value, Beardsley, ethical, Kant, Scruton, Sibley, virtues

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .