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Words and ThoughtsSubsentences, Ellipsis, and the Philosophy of Language$
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Robert Stainton

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199250387

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199250387.001.0001

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Introduction: The Appearances, and What They Might Mean

Introduction: The Appearances, and What They Might Mean

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Introduction: The Appearances, and What They Might Mean
Source:
Words and Thoughts
Author(s):

Robert J. Stainton (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199250387.003.0001

This chapter introduces and explains the two key premises around which the book is built. Premise 1 says that speakers genuinely can utter ordinary words and phrases in isolation, and thereby perform full-fledged speech acts. Premise 2 says that if speakers genuinely can utter ordinary words and phrases in isolation, and thereby perform full-fledged speech acts, then such-and-such implications obtain. What emerges repeatedly from the discussion of the two premises, and in several different ways, are two issues about words and thoughts: whether mere words (as opposed to sentences) can be used to state complete thoughts, and what the answer to this question entails about the general issue of how language (i.e., ‘words’) relates to thinking (i.e., ‘thoughts’). It is these two issues about words and thoughts that give rise to the title of the book.

Keywords:   speech, phrases, language, sentences

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