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Magic Mineral to Killer DustTurner & Newall and the Asbestos Hazard$
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Geoffrey Tweedale

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243990

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243990.001.0001

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Lighting the Powder Trail

Lighting the Powder Trail

Chapter:
(p.178) 8 Lighting the Powder Trail
Source:
Magic Mineral to Killer Dust
Author(s):

Geoffrey Tweedale

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243990.003.0008

In retrospect, it seems remarkable that the asbestos industry should have declined so swiftly. It was the 1960s — especially the mid-1960s — when the tide turned. The first force for change was economic. Turner & Newall's profits hit a peak in the mid-1960s and then dipped as technology and the company's manufacturing profile changed. The other catalyst for change was the rising trend of suspensions and deaths. After 1931 it had been hoped that the suspension rate would fall as less dusty conditions made asbestosis a disease of the past. For a while — in the 1930s and early 1940s — it had seemed as if this might happen: then in the 1950s and early 1960s, the number of new cases of asbestosis in the UK began rising.

Keywords:   asbestos industry, Turner & Newall, asbestosis, employee death

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