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The Life of David Hume$
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Ernest C. Mossner

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.001.0001

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Tranquillity in France

Tranquillity in France

Chapter:
(p.92) Chapter 8 Tranquillity in France
Source:
The Life of David Hume
Author(s):

Ernest Campbell Mossner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.003.0008

David Hume must have experienced poignant emotions on first setting foot in France. The national, cultural, and sentimental ties of many centuries that bound Scotland to France would not have been repudiated by the young Revolutionary Whig, and indeed would rather have been augmented by his admiration for the literature of the period of Louis XIV and by his respect for French philosophy. It is most unlikely that Hume's Protestantism was sufficiently strong for him to have echoed with any sincerity the remark of his countryman, Lord Fountainhall. His love for France, indeed, as expressed in an essay of 1741, was virtually unbounded. During his stay in France, from 1734 to 1737, Hume composed the Treatise of Human Nature and studied l'Art de Vivre.

Keywords:   David Hume, France, Scotland, literature, Louis XIV, philosophy, Protestantism, Lord Fountainhall, Human Nature, l'Art de Vivre

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