Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Life of David Hume$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ernest C. Mossner

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 November 2018

Disease of the Learned

Disease of the Learned

Chapter:
(p.66) Chapter 6 Disease of the Learned
Source:
The Life of David Hume
Author(s):

Ernest Campbell Mossner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.003.0006

His precipitous abandoning of the law in the spring of 1729 gave David Hume a needed opportunity to exploit the ‘new Scene of Thought’ that had so suddenly and excitingly been opened up to his vision. The course of character improvement that Hume had been putting himself through on the basis of moral maxims from the ancient pagan philosophers he came to recognise, too late, as a contributory factor to the ruining of his health. Morbid introspection may become a variety of auto-intoxication and is curable only by extraordinary effort on the part of the diseased. Hume, apparently, made that effort and regained self-mastery. Unwilling to admit that he might be afflicted with the ‘vapors’ or lowness of spirits, a disease of the mind which he vainly imagined was restricted to the idle rich, Hume became worried over some scurvy spots that broke out on his fingers.

Keywords:   law, David Hume, Scene of Thought, character, improvement, maxims, pagan, philosophers, health

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .