Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Life of David Hume$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ernest C. Mossner

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2018

Political Discourses

Political Discourses

Chapter:
(p.256) (p.257) Chapter 20 Political Discourses
Source:
The Life of David Hume
Author(s):

Ernest Campbell Mossner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.003.0020

During the summer of 1751 David Hume had come to entertain so high an opinion of Robert Wallace as to permit him to read in manuscript form one of the papers that he was to publish the following year as Political Discourses. This was apparently by way of reciprocation for the courtesy Wallace had shown in asking Hume's opinion of a composition upon which he had been working for at least five or six years and which was to appear in 1753 under the title of A Dissertation on the Numbers of Mankind in Antient and Modern Times. The paper that Wallace had read before the Philosophical Society and which subsequently underwent such romantic adventures was an elementary study of the thesis that the ancient world was much more populated than the modern; it concluded with seven suggestions for the increase of modern population.

Keywords:   David Hume, Robert Wallace, Political Discourses, A Dissertation, paper, Philosophical Society, population

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .