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The Life of David Hume$
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Ernest C. Mossner

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.001.0001

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Achievement of Ambition

Achievement of Ambition

Chapter:
(p.222) (p.223) Chapter 17 Achievement of Ambition
Source:
The Life of David Hume
Author(s):

Ernest Campbell Mossner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.003.0017

The rise and progress of David Hume's reputation may be delineated through the opinions of certain influential periodicals, British and Continental, and of certain important individuals. The commonly accepted account of Hume's vogue in the 1750s is that it began in France with the publication of the Political Discourses and ultimately redounded to Britain. The facts, however, do not support this thesis, but tend to show, on the contrary, that his fame burst out spontaneously on both sides of the Channel in 1752, that the fires were fed by the later publications, 1754–62, and by the increasing tempo of the several controversies. Articles of 1752 in two leading periodicals, one English and one Continental, may be cited in this connexion. The January 1752 number of the Monthly Review is virtually a Hume number, the first article dealing with the Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, and the second with the Political Discourses.

Keywords:   David Hume, periodicals, France, Political Discourses, Britain, Monthly Review, Principles of Morals

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