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The Life of David Hume$
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Ernest C. Mossner

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.001.0001

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A Military Embassy

A Military Embassy

Chapter:
(p.205) Chapter 16 A Military Embassy
Source:
The Life of David Hume
Author(s):

Ernest Campbell Mossner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.003.0016

At Ninewells in July, David Hume, who had by no means given up the half-pay fight even though the War Office had turned down his petition, began a campaign against the Treasury. He was otherwise busy with several literary ventures that have already been touched upon. The most important of these was the final revision of the manuscript of the Philosophical Essays concerning Human Understanding, preparatory to publishing them. In November 1747, Hume had begged off going to London to wage the campaign against the Treasury, yet before the end of the following January there he was. General James St Clair had sought him out in his solitude, inviting him to be his secretary once more, this time on a secret military embassy to Vienna and Turin. In the midst of important literary activities, Hume was far from enthusiastic, but permitted friends to persuade him to accept.

Keywords:   Ninewells, David Hume, War Office, Treasury, Philosophical Essays, James St Clair, military, embassy, Vienna, Turin

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