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The Life of David Hume$
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Ernest C. Mossner

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.001.0001

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The Unfortunate Tutor

The Unfortunate Tutor

Chapter:
(p.163) Chapter 13 The Unfortunate Tutor
Source:
The Life of David Hume
Author(s):

Ernest Campbell Mossner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.003.0013

In 1745, David Hume received a letter from the Marquess of Annandale, inviting him to come and live with him in England. Hume tells this in My Own Life, giving no hint of any fracas and little more than a hint about the madness of the Marquess. The complete story of this unhappy year proves, however, that Hume's brief account is correctly pointed, that its chief value to him was the increase in his small fortune. The terms of the contract were designed to afford a modicum of protection to the gentleman-companion from possible vacillations on the part of the Marquess, to which the long string of tutors he had previously had bears mute testimony. Hume was further protected by the contract in that, if he was offered the Edinburgh professorship, he was entitled to resign immediately and to receive full compensation for his services.

Keywords:   David Hume, letter, Marquess of Annandale, England, My Own Life, contract, tutors, Edinburgh, professorship

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