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Handbook of Communication in Oncology and Palliative
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David Kissane, Barry Bultz, Phyllis Butow, and Ilora Finlay

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199238361

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199238361.001.0001

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Communication skills training and research: the Brussels experience

Communication skills training and research: the Brussels experience

Chapter:
(p.671) Chapter 58 Communication skills training and research: the Brussels experience
Source:
Handbook of Communication in Oncology and Palliative Care
Author(s):

Isabelle Merckaert

Yves Libert

Darius Razavi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199238361.003.0058

In the last two decades, communication skills training programmes, designed for healthcare professionals working in cancer care, have been the focus of several of the research endeavours of the Brussels research group. The efficacy of these programmes has been tested in studies using a controlled design. Studies varied in the type of healthcare professional, the type of teaching method, the length of training, and the outcome measures. As a result, research efforts have focused on communication skills to be taught and on training techniques to be used. The aim of the randomised controlled trials was to determine the optimal duration of a training programme in order to ensure training effects. The choice of the skills taught was based on results of studies indicating the positive impact of using specific communication skills on cancer patients' disclosure of concerns. The results confirm the usefulness of communication skills training programmes for healthcare professionals working in cancer care.

Keywords:   Brussels, communication skills, training, healthcare professionals, cancer care, randomised controlled trials, cancer patients, disclosure

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