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Public Health BrandingApplying marketing for social change$
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W. Douglas Evans and Gerard Hastings

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199237135

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199237135.001.0001

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High brand recognition in the context of an unsuccessful communication campaign: The National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign

High brand recognition in the context of an unsuccessful communication campaign: The National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign

Chapter:
(p.147) 8 High brand recognition in the context of an unsuccessful communication campaign: The National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign
Source:
Public Health Branding
Author(s):

Lela Jacobsohn

Robert C. Hornik

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199237135.003.0008

The brand name associated with the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign was highly recognized, but this brand name awareness did not translate into the intended change in cognitive or behavioural marijuana use outcomes. There are several approaches to brand name recognition measurement, including the comparison of recognition rates of true and false brand phrases, and their association with ad exposure; here they provide parallel support to claims of substantial brand name learning. However, recognition measures comprise only one aspect of overall brand evaluation measures. Strong brand name recognition can link together the ads of a public health communication campaign. This connectedness or aggregating of the messages may lead to positive or negative consequences for the campaign.

Keywords:   National Youth Anti-drug Campaign, branding, brand recognition, false brands, message aggregation or connectedness

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