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Speech Motor ControlNew developments in basic and applied research$
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Ben Maassen and Pascal van Lieshout

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199235797

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235797.001.0001

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Cerebral control of motor aspects of speech production: neurophysiological and functional imaging data

Cerebral control of motor aspects of speech production: neurophysiological and functional imaging data

Chapter:
(p.117) Chapter 7 Cerebral control of motor aspects of speech production: neurophysiological and functional imaging data
Source:
Speech Motor Control
Author(s):

Hermann Ackermann

Axel Riecker

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235797.003.0007

This chapter reviews functional imaging and electrophysiological studies addressing the cerebral organization of speech motor control. Functional imaging studies, based upon the production/repetition of lexical and non-lexical mono- or polysyllabic items, point at a ‘minimal brain network’ of motor aspects of speech production, encompassing the supplementary motor area (SMA) within the medial wall of the frontal lobe, opercular parts of the precentral gyrus and posterior components of the inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area), the anterior insula at the floor of the lateral sulcus, the ‘mouth region’ of the primary sensorimotor cortex, the basal ganglia, thalamus, and the cerebellar hemispheres. Depending upon task demands and the selected activation contrasts, hemodynamic responses of other cerebral structures such as the superior temporal gyrus and lower parietal areas may emerge as well. Most noteworthy, functional imaging techniques now begin to provide new insights into the pathomechanisms of dysarthric deficits such as abnormalities of speaking rate in Parkinson's disease or in cerebellar ataxia.

Keywords:   functional imaging studies, speech motor control, speech production, inferior frontal gyrus, sensorimotor cortex

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