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Speech Motor ControlNew developments in basic and applied research$
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Ben Maassen and Pascal van Lieshout

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199235797

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235797.001.0001

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Motor speech profile in relation to site of brain pathology: a developmental perspective

Motor speech profile in relation to site of brain pathology: a developmental perspective

Chapter:
(p.95) Chapter 6 Motor speech profile in relation to site of brain pathology: a developmental perspective
Source:
Speech Motor Control
Author(s):

Angela Morgan

Frédérique Liégeois

Faraneh Vargha-Khadem

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235797.003.0006

Few reports exist on motor speech profiles of children with congenital or acquired brain damage, relating the speech disorder to its compromised neural substrate. This chapter examines motor speech characteristics in representative cases with: speech and orofacial dyspraxia resulting from mutation of the FOXP2 gene; dysarthria resulting from the resection of posterior fossa tumour; and dysarthria associated with hemispherectomy for treatment of intractable epilepsy. The neuropathology that is implicated in each type of motor speech disorder is considered with the aim of identifying those aspects of the motor circuitry that may have become disrupted as a result of the brain damage. The role of bilateral versus unilateral neuropathology, and the involvement of the fronto-striatal and fronto-cerebellar loops in dyspraxia and dysarthria are discussed.

Keywords:   brain damage, children, speech profiles, orofacial dyspraxia, dysarthria

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