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Industrial Policy and Development
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Industrial Policy and Development: The Political Economy of Capabilities Accumulation

Mario Cimoli, Giovanni Dosi, and Joseph E. Stiglitz

Abstract

In the 1990s, development policy advocated by international financial institutions was influenced by the so-called Washington Consensus thinking. This strategy, based largely on liberalization, privatization, and price-flexibility, downplayed, if not disregarded, the role of government in steering the processes of technological learning and economic growth. With the exception of the Far East, many developing countries adopted the view that industrial policy resulted in inefficiency and poor economic growth. However, industrial policies have been successfully employed in the past in the countri ... More

Keywords: industrial policies, knowledge accumulation, science and technology policies, trade policies, infant industries, rent-seeking opportunities, patterns of specialization, intellectual property rights, competition, organizational capabilities

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2009 Print ISBN-13: 9780199235261
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235261.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Mario Cimoli, editor
Professor of Economics, University of Venice, and Economic Affairs Officer, ECLAC, United Nations

Giovanni Dosi, editor
Professor of Economics, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa
Author Webpage

Joseph E. Stiglitz, editor
University Professor, Columbia University
Author Webpage

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Contents

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Part I General Introduction

Part II Industrial Policies in a Historical Perspective

Part III National and Regional Experiences

Part IV Conclusion

End Matter