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PreemptionMilitary Action and Moral Justification$
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Henry Shue and David Rodin

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199233137

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199233137.001.0001

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Preventive War and US Foreign Policy

Preventive War and US Foreign Policy

Chapter:
(p.40) 2 Preventive War and US Foreign Policy
Source:
Preemption
Author(s):

Marc Trachtenberg

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199233137.003.0003

This chapter discusses US policy on preventive war. Following September 11, 2001, the Bush Administration established a new national security policy that was no longer based on the principle of deterrence, but based on pre-emption. It is shown that the Bush strategy is anomalous and has really broken with American tradition. This is done by considering the policies pursued by other American governments, and in particular by looking at how the Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and even Clinton administrations dealt with this sort of problem in earlier phases of the atomic age, but also by looking with some care at the policy the Roosevelt administration pursued in the period before Pearl Harbor.

Keywords:   United States, defence policy, prevention, national security, Bush administration, pre-emption, military policy

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