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Scottish and Irish Romanticism$
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Murray Pittock

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199232796

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199232796.001.0001

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Robert Fergusson and his Scottish and Irish Contemporaries

Robert Fergusson and his Scottish and Irish Contemporaries

Chapter:
(p.120) 5 Robert Fergusson and his Scottish and Irish Contemporaries
Source:
Scottish and Irish Romanticism
Author(s):

Murray Pittock (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199232796.003.0005

This chapter examines the near-complete absence of Fergusson from British literary history in the context of his high status in Scotland, exploring his linguistic innovation, his development and extension of the range of a synthetic Scots, his attacks on the metropolitan standard, his politics, and his particular inflection of the ‘turn to the ode’ in later 18th-century writing. Consideration is given to Fergusson and James Beattie's links to the Romantic aesthetic as commonly understood. The chapter closes with a brief examination of Scottish and Irish writing in the period, the figure of Wallace, and writing across the English/Gaelic divide.

Keywords:   Fergusson, James Beattie, double-voicedness, Edinburgh, Johnson, Wallace, English/Gaelic divide

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