Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Nietzsche on Freedom and Autonomy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ken Gemes and Simon May

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199231560

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231560.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 13 November 2018

Nietzsche on Free Will, Autonomy, and the Sovereign Individual

Nietzsche on Free Will, Autonomy, and the Sovereign Individual

Chapter:
(p.33) 2 Nietzsche on Free Will, Autonomy, and the Sovereign Individual
Source:
Nietzsche on Freedom and Autonomy
Author(s):

Ken Gemes (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231560.003.0002

In some texts Nietzsche vehemently denies the possibility of free will; in others he seems positively to countenance its existence. This chapter distinguishes two different notions of free will. Agency free will is intrinsically tied to the question of agency; what constitutes an action as opposed to a mere doing. Deserts free will is intrinsically tied to the question of desert; of who does and does not merit punishment and reward. It is shown that we can render Nietzsche's prima facie conflicting assertions regarding free will compatible by interpreting him as rejecting deserts free will while accepting the possibility of agency free will. Nietzsche advances an original form of compatibilism that takes agency free will to be a rare achievement rather than a natural endowment.

Keywords:   deserts free will, agency free will, responsibility, compatibilism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .